A Beautiful Day

It’s a sunny 61 degrees here in Dallas.

Just cold enough that I can open all the windows while I work, as a slight breeze gently moves through my apartment.

Jasper is laying on the carpet, making the most of each slit of sunlight as it pours from the blinds and onto the floor.

And outside, it’s chilly in the shade, enough so that you can feel the sun when you step out into it. It tingles, warm and inviting on your skin.

And all of it under a clear blue sky, remarkable to me not because of what’s there, but because of what isn’t.

Polar Ice Sheet, 1979 to present.

Sea ice is frozen seawater floating on the surface of the ocean. Some sea ice is semi-permanent, persisting from year to year, and some is seasonal, melting and refreezing from season to season. The sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent at the end of each summer and the remaining ice is called the perennial ice cover. The 2007 Arctic summer sea ice has reached the lowest extent of perennial ice cover on record – nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. But the 2007 minimum, reached on September 14, is far below the previous record made in 2005 and is about 38% lower than the climatological average. Such a dramatic loss has implications for ecology, climate and industry.”